More than economists

18 Nov, 2021 at 16:17 | Posted in Economics | 2 Comments

Veblen, Keynes, and Hirschman were more than economists because they practiced their economics from a standpoint outside the profession, using it to criticize not only the assumption of rational self-interest, but also the consequences of economists’ indifference to “preferences.” Veblen’s standpoint was explicitly religious; he was still of a believing generation. Keynes, too, was an ethicist. G.E. Moore’s Principia Ethica remained what he called his “religion under the surface.” Hirschman wanted a “moral social science” that would be continually sensitive to the ethical content of its analysis …

Prof. Lord Robert Skidelsky (C. 1953-58), OB of the Month, July 2012 - Old  Brightonians - The Alumni of Brighton CollegeThese three economists’ frequently mocking style was their way of establishing their distance from their profession. Their irony was not ornamental but actually shaped the substance of their arguments. This style limited their impact on economics, but made them highly influential outside it, because critics of economics sensed something transgressive about them.

Systematic thinkers close a subject, leaving their followers with “normal” science to fill up the learned journals. Fertile ones open up their disciplines to critical scrutiny, for which they rarely get credit.

Robert Skidelsky

2 Comments »

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  1. Nice analysis may be too concentrated.
    Thank for your sense of humour

  2. Could we add in this department : Marx, Myrdal….and Galbraith (the father, the son, and the holy spirit)..

    Regards,

    Raphaël Erkoreka.


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