It’s not just p = 0.048 vs. p = 0.052

9 Sep, 2019 at 17:37 | Posted in Statistics & Econometrics | Comments Off on It’s not just p = 0.048 vs. p = 0.052

“[G]iven the realities of real-world research, it seems goofy to say that a result with, say, only a 4.8% probability of happening by chance is “significant,” while if the result had a 5.2% probability of happening by chance it is “not significant.” Uncertainty is a continuum, not a black-and-white difference” …

worshipMy problem with the 0.048 vs. 0.052 thing is that it way, way, way understates the problem.

Yes, there’s no stable difference between p = 0.048 and p = 0.052.

But there’s also no stable difference between p = 0.2 (which is considered non-statistically significant by just about everyone) and p = 0.005 (which is typically considered very strong evidence) …

If these two p-values come from two identical experiments, then the standard error of their difference is sqrt(2) times the standard error of each individual estimate, hence that difference in p-values itself is only (2.81 – 1.28)/sqrt(2) = 1.1 standard errors away from zero …

So. Yes, it seems goofy to draw a bright line between p = 0.048 and p = 0.052. But it’s also goofy to draw a bright line between p = 0.2 and p = 0.005. There’s a lot less information in these p-values than people seem to think.

So, when we say that the difference between “significant” and “not significant” is not itself statistically significant, “we are not merely making the commonplace observation that any particular threshold is arbitrary—for example, only a small change is required to move an estimate from a 5.1% significance level to 4.9%, thus moving it into statistical significance. Rather, we are pointing out that even large changes in significance levels can correspond to small, nonsignificant changes in the underlying quantities.”

Andrew Gelman

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